Life Notes “The Voice”-John 1:23

     “The Voice”-John 1:23 

Remember: you are dust, and to dust you shall return.” Those are the words that are said as the ashes of the palm branches are placed on our forehead at the Ash Wednesday service. But there is more. Dust is not our destiny. Our destiny is to be with God forever. Paul quotes the Old Testament prophet Hosea, “Death is swallowed up in victory,” and then adds, “But thanks be to God, who gives us the victory through our Lord Jesus Christ.” 1 Corinthians 15:54 & 57 Jesus, the descendant of David, fulfilled the promise of a king, a Messiah to come. Jesus was the Word but before the Word came the Voice. Listen to the voice tonight and remember we are dust but buried with Christ we are raised with Him and live in His Kingdom now and forever.

                                         

Question: When was the practice of Lent started?

Answer: Lent is one of the oldest observations on the Christian calendar. Like all Christian holy days and holidays, it has changed over the years, but its purpose has always been the same: self-examination and penitence, demonstrated by self-denial, in preparation for Easter. Early church father Irenaus of Lyons (c.130-c.200) wrote of such a season in the earliest days of the church, but back then it lasted only two or three days, not the 40

observed today.

Life Notes Who Shall I Send?” Isaiah 6:8

Life Notes:

Who Shall I Send?” Isaiah 6:8

What attributes does a leader need? Why is someone chosen to lead a project, a team, a company, a nation? Terms such as dynamic, wise, dedicated, and charismatic come to mind. Considerate, tough, kind, knowledgeable, thorough and organized also are terms used to describe leaders. Today, we will look at how God chose a leader that led a nation with his voice. As the Spirit led Isaiah he spoke to God’s people and told them of God’s demands, justice and unending love.
What assets did Isaiah have that made him the right one to be selected by God for this task about telling people about the Messiah to come? Certainly Isaiah had been prepared. Yes, he was in the Royal Court with the advantage of being in contact and knowing powerful people. He was educated. But the first and foremost asset that he and we also have, is he was selected, chosen. Concerned that he was not worthy to be in God’s presence he was forgiven. Then he heard the words, “Who Shall I Send? There could only be one answer for Isaiah and only one answer for us, “Send me!”

               Life Received, Life Together, Life Giving- John 10:10

                    

Question: Why did the nation of Israel split into the northern and southern kingdom?

Answer: When Solomon’s died, his son Rehoboam wanted to raise taxes and the northern 10 tribes rebelled. The northern kingdom is called “Israel” (or sometimes “Ephraim”) in Scripture, and the southern kingdom is called “Judah.”  

Life Notes Elijah’s Super Bowl 1 Kings 18: 1-2, 17-40

Elijah’s Super Bowl 1 Kings 18: 1-2, 17-40

The word Almighty is used 56 times in scripture and it always refers to God; never to anyone else.  God is all powerful, or omnipotent.  There is nothing He can’t do. What a staggering thought. In today’s text God, through the prophet Elijah, demonstrates His superiority over the power of darkness – false gods and their prophets.  This is the all-powerful God that we gather to worship. So how to you envision God?  As timeless, in?nite, all-powerful, unchanging, glorious?  Or do you see Him as one who can be fooled or manipulated by human hypocrisy?  If one sees and believes Him to be one who has unlimited power and strength we can’t help but ?nd security in him to face any and all challenges and temptations in life.  Today we are called to re?ect.  How big is our God?  If the Lord is God, then it’s time to follow Him.

           Question: What is Baal worship?

Answer: Baal was the name of the supreme god worshiped in ancient Canaan and Phoenicia. The practice of Baal worship infiltrated Jewish religious life during the time of the Judges (Judges 3:7), became widespread in Israel during the reign of Ahab (1 Kings 16:31-33) and also affected Judah (2 Chronicles 28:1-2). The wordbaal means “lord”; the plural is baalim. In general, Baal was a fertility god who was believed to enable the earth to produce crops and people to produce children. Baal worship was rooted in sensuality and involved ritualistic prostitution in the temples. At times, appeasing Baal required human sacrifice, usually the firstborn of the one making the sacrifice (Jeremiah 19:5). The priests of Baal appealed to their god in rites of wild abandon which included loud, ecstatic cries and self-inflicted injury (1 Kings 18:28).